A Special Week for Singles?

A Special Week for Singles?

Call them unmarried or call them single, issue a press release, make a special week about it, but at the end of the day, single people still get screwed.

Unmarried-and-Single-Americans-Week

konstantynov / 123RF Photo

Last week was Unmarried and Single Americans Week, a “celebration” that was started back in the 1980s by a singles organization in Ohio, was handed off to the Singles Press Association, got a much needed boost from the advocacy group Unmarried America and additional muscle from the U.S. Census Bureau which now puts out an annual press release about it with links to current national statistics about living single in America.

Being the recipient of continual information about singles, my inbox filled up fast with links to stories like “10 Ways to Celebrate Being Single,” “15 Reasons Why Being Single Is Better,” “How to Enjoy Being Single” and such. There was one single writer with a blog titled, “Do We Really Need National Singles Week?” (The conclusion was that being single shouldn’t be a big deal, so why all the hoopla?)

But in our offices at Singular magazine? Nothing. Why? Well, besides it being “singles week” all year long around here, Unmarried and Single Americans Week reminds me of the problem: relationship status shouldn’t be something that needs a special week in the first place — maybe not even a special magazine.

It shouldn’t matter whether you’re dating, not dating, married, widowed, divorced, cohabitating or not interested in a romantic relationship at all. Your relationship status should not be something that others use to determine, in advance of knowing you, who you are and what you’re about. And certainly being single is not something that should relegate you to any kind of second-class status by the populace at large.

Unmarried and Single Americans Week is supposed to remind everyone that it’s okay to be single, even though if you’re not legally married, you’re missing out on a whole slew of perks and benefits that married people get by virtue of having signed a marriage contract with the State. And a singles week will likely not do a whole lot to keep your married friends from finding a way to let you know that you’re not quite as socially successful and mature as they are.

It’s also very likely that no matter how outstanding and noble your achievements, if you remain single and, even worse, never marry ever at all,  it will be seen as a fatal flaw that casts a shadow over all of your other achievements. I don’t like it. I think it’s ridiculous, unjust and an outright travesty.

It might be “nice” that we have a National Unmarried and Single Americans Week, but what would really be nice is if our relationship status didn’t have such a big impact on how we are perceived by the government, influential institutions, our family and our friends.

Now that would be something to celebrate.

Copyright © Kim Calvert/2013 Singular Communications, LLC.

Kim CalvertKim Calvert is the editor of Singular magazine and the founder of the SingularCity social networking community. An outspoken champion of people who are living their lives as a “me” instead of a “we,” Kim oversees the creative direction and editorial content of the magazine and online social networking community. She secures contributors and is responsible for maintaining the fun, upbeat, inspirational and often-humorous tone of Singular, a lifestyle guide for successful single living.


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3 thoughts on “A Special Week for Singles?

  1. We are judged on every aspect of our lives. It can be your job, clothes, pets, hair color, political preferences, religion, skin color, shoes, hobbies, basically, anything you can say about a person, someone will judge you on it. It would be shocking if we weren’t judged on being single.

  2. I love being single again…and tell people who give me the ‘oh that is so sad that you are single’ that I love flying solo and only I am responsible for the decisions I make…and it is exhilirating!!

  3. I have never felt judged on being single. Probably because I broadcast to everyone that I consider it the most intelligent thing I’ve ever done in my life!

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